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AFRICAN REVIEW 2010

A Microeconometric Analysis of Household Savings Determinants in Morocco  A Microeconometric Analysis of Household Savings Determinants in Morocco

TOUHAMI ABDELKHALEK, FLORENCE ARESTOFF, NAJAT EL MEKKAOUI DE FREITAS, SABINE MAGE    
This article provides an analysis of the microeconomic determinants of household savings behaviour in Morocco according to geographical household residence. Descriptive statistics seem to indicate a similar savings pattern in both rural and urban areas but the econometric results do not support this conclusion. Current income strongly affects the savings level in the urban area whereas the literacy of the household’s head is determinant in the rural one. However, the results do not confirm the life cycle hypothesis. The household’s size has a significant negative impact only in the urban case, while women heads of household save more than men, except for highest income levels. The results clearly show that urban and rural households behave differently with regards to savings.

Does regulation Impact on Microfinance Performance? A Case Study of Cameroon  Does regulation Impact on Microfinance Performance? A Case Study of Cameroon

FOUDA OWOUNDI JEAN PIERRE    
Microfinance regulation is currently a highly debated topic in view of the increasing interest on the issue by the international community. In this paper we investigate its impact on performance of microfinance institutions using OLS regressions applied on panel data from a sample of 180 institutions from CAMCULL, an important data source of microfinance institutions in Cameroon. The data include variables on 2007 and 2008 balance sheet and income statements. The results of our analysis show that regulation has a negative impact on performance and especially on credit to finance growth.

Paying for community-based health insurance schemes in rural Nigeria: the use of in-kind payments  Paying for community-based health insurance schemes in rural Nigeria: the use of in-kind payments

WILLIAM M. FONTA, H. EME ICHOKU & JOHN E. ATAGUBA    
Financing healthcare for the poor is one major challenge facing the world’s poorest populations in developing countries. While over 90% of the global burden of disease is borne by over 80%, only about 11% of global health spending is on the poor. Community-based health insurance schemes (CBHIS) have emerged in Africa for mobilizing community resources. They can also be a stepping stone to a more formal and potentially universal coverage. In parts of Africa where such schemes exist, they have not effectively covered the target population. Nigeria has a few such schemes. This paper uses the contingent valuation to examine the possibility of adopting CBHIS using in-kind payments in rural Nigeria. The study finds that gender, household size, health status, the quality of health care centers, confidence in the proposed scheme, distance to the nearest health care center and income are major determinants of households’ willingness to pay (WTP) for the scheme.

Sensitivity of Loan Size to Lending Rates Evidence from Ghana’s Microfinance Sector  Sensitivity of Loan Size to Lending Rates Evidence from Ghana’s Microfinance Sector

SAMUEL KOBINA ANNIM    
This study examines the combined effect of interest rates and poverty levels of microfinance clients on loan size. Cross section data on 1800 households (698 clients and 1102 non-clients) from Ghana is used to test the hypothesis of loan price inelasticity. Quantile regression and variants of least squares methods that explore endogeneity are employed. The expected inverse relationship is observed for the poorest specifically, respondents between the 20th to 40th quantile range. Concentrating on different poverty groups of MFI clients, we observe that a change in interest rate leads to varying responses for the demand of loan amount. In view of this, market segmentation based on poverty level is suggested in targeting and sustaining microfinance clients.

Testing the Impact of Foreign Aid on Domestic Private Investment in West Africa  Testing the Impact of Foreign Aid on Domestic Private Investment in West Africa

EBERECHUKWU UNEZE    
Drawing on the vast literature on aid allocation, this paper examines whether foreign aid has any impact on private investment in West Africa, controlling for other determinants of private investment. Following from this, the paper investigates whether multilateral aid and bilateral aid affect private investment differently. In a related analysis, the paper examines the impact of aid uncertainty on private investment. The results show that multilateral aid affects private investment positively, but not bilateral aid, and aid uncertainty, defined by the coefficient of variation has a negative impact on private investment and therefore reduces the impact of aid on domestic private investment.